Ongoing snow removal continues to cause traffic nightmares

- It was another night of horrific traffic gridlock in the D.C. area Thursday thanks to ongoing snow removal efforts. Once again, drivers sat for hours during the evening rush.

“We've just been sitting here in traffic trying to leave Georgetown, head back out to the Manassas area,” said Anouk Gazale. “We've gone one block in 45 minutes.”

“About 20 minutes in this last block,” said Larry Rubenstein. “I mean, they're open. We have a lane down the street, it's very exciting, but we need more than one lane.”

These commuters are weary, fed up and ready to get home, but they are stuck in traffic caused by excess snow that are eliminating lanes and making moving around nearly impossible at every turn.

“This is going to be this way until it melts, I'm sure,” said Rubenstein.

But why? Other major cities in similar circumstances would seemingly be up and running smoothly by now.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s spokesperson, Michael Czin, said you can’t compare Washington D.C. to other cities because we have fewer workers to remove the snow.

And for some it shows.

“We ended up just parking our car and thought it would probably be quicker to walk there, and it's probably going to take us five minutes to walk there versus probably sitting in traffic for 45 minutes,” said another commuter named Sophie.

Even so, Czin said the District’s bobcats and dump trucks are going back through neighborhoods and the downtown corridor to remove excess snow, which he said is causing a ripple effect including massive traffic.

“I'm not sure what resources they have so I'm going to give them the benefit of the doubt on this one,” said Sarah Eastright.

The District is urging commuters to take public transportation or build in extra time for the morning and evening commutes.

Looking ahead, Czin said the mayor’s office will do several internal assessments to see what they can do better moving forward.

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