Capitol Police: No specific threat to Capitol but be careful

photo

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers and their aides should use the tunnels between congressional buildings and take other precautions, but there are no specific threats against the Capitol following the Paris terrorist attacks, the police agency that provides security for Congress said in a memo to lawmakers' offices Monday.

In an email to congressional offices obtained by The Associated Press, the Capitol Police wrote that "out of an abundance of caution" people should use tunnels connecting the Capitol with adjacent House and Senate office buildings, a short walk people often make outdoors. It urges those who work for Congress to make sure their offices know where they are.

The email says the Capitol Police have an "increased presence and visibility" on the Capitol complex in the wake of the Friday attacks in France. It also calls on people working on Capitol Hill to report anything suspicious.

"While there currently is no specific threat to the Capitol Complex it will always be an appealing target," the memo says. It says the Capitol Police "continues to be on the highest alert."

A Capitol Police spokeswoman, Capt. Kimberly Schneider, declined to provide detail about the agency's reaction to the Paris attacks.

The memo was sent the same day that the Islamic State group, which has claimed responsibility for the Paris attacks, released a video showing one its fighters in Iraq vowing to attack Washington.

One fighter says Muslims should strike in the West because the U.S.-led coalition is targeting the Islamic State group in Iraq. Another warns that as "we struck France on its ground in Paris we will strike America on its ground in Washington."

 App Store Get it on Google Play

  • Popular

  • Recent

More Stories You May Be Interested In - Includes Advertiser Stories