WATCH: Wild horse kicks lifeguard on Assateague Island

- Video of a wild horse kicking an Assateague Island lifeguard last weekend is going viral, and officials say it serves as a reminder to beachgoers. The video shows the horse on a crowded section of the beach. The lifeguard was trying to urge the horse to move along when the animal used its back legs to kick the man. Thankfully, the lifeguard suffered only minor abrasions.

 
Horse Kicks Lifeguard on Beach

The human/horse interaction that was captured here over the weekend is a stark reminder of the power and unpredictability of wild horses. These types of interactions can happen in an instant, even to National Park Service personnel who have been trained to move horses from the beach. Help prevent this scenario from happening in the first place by folllowing these simple tips:* Please do not make food or water available to the horses.* When possible, keep food safely stored in a vehicle. If food must be brought to the beach, store it in a sturdy zippered bag or in a cooler that is secured shut with a strap.* Give the horses their space. Move at least a bus length away when a horse approaches. Do not try to save your belongings; wait until the horse is out of the area.*Wild horses communicate. Watch for pinned ears and sudden movements, as they indicate agitation that can lead to kicking and biting.Unfortunately, incidents like this happen every year. The lifeguard in the video suffered minor abrasions but was otherwise unhurt. Regardless of your comfort level around horses remember that the wild horses are powerful, unpredictable animals.

Posted by Assateague Island National Seashore on Wednesday, September 2, 2015

 

On Facebook, the Assateague Island National Seashore says this incident shows that wild horses are powerful and unpredictable animals, regardless of your comfort level around them.

SAFETY TIPS:

-- Please do not make food or water available to the horses.

-- When possible, keep food safely stored in a vehicle. If food must be brought to the beach, store it in a sturdy zippered bag or in a cooler that is secured shut with a strap

-- Give the horses their space. Move at least a bus length away when a horse approaches. Do not try to save your belongings; wait until the horse is out of the area

--Wild horses communicate. Watch for pinned ears and sudden movements, as they indicate agitation that can lead to kicking and biting.

 

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